Sunday, Sep 23, 2018
One of America's Great Newspapers ~ Toledo, Ohio

Barbara Hendel

ON THE TOWN

New museum dedicated to Catawba Island history

  • DSCF1420-jpg-1

    A crowd begins to assemble for the ribbon-cutting and dedication ceremony for the Catawba Museum at Union Chapel.

  • SOC-catawba-10

    Kenneth Landon and Bill VanDerGeisson at the Catawba Island Museum.

    THE BLADE/BARBARA HENDEL
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-catawba-11

    Cherry Pierce and her granddaughter Lexi Fodor, who designed the Catawba Island Historical Society Museum logo.

    THE BLADE/BARBARA HENDEL
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-catawba-12

    Kenneth Landon, Lexi Fodor, and Bill VanDerGeisson at the Catawba Island Historical Society Museum.

    THE BLADE/BARBARA HENDEL
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-catawba-13

    Bill Van DerGeisson and Cherry Pierce at the Catawba Island Historical Society Museum.

    THE BLADE/BARBARA HENDEL
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-catawba-14

    SOC Barbara Hendel for Town; Barbara Hendel/The Blade. Catawba Island Museum. Bill Van DerGeisson and Cherry Pierce

    THE BLADE/BARBARA HENDEL
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-catawba-15

    Connie Batterton and Craig Koerpel at the Catawba Island Historical Society Museum.

  • SOC-catawba-16

    Inside the Catawba Island Historical Society Museum where the first exhibit is on the Lake Erie's Ice Industry from the 1900's.

  • SOC-catawba-17

    Inside the Catawba Island Historical Society Museum where the first exhibit is on the Lake Erie's Ice Industry from the 1900's.

  • DSCF1448-2-jpg-1

    Ribbon is cut by Don Rhodes at the June 16 dedication of Catawba Museum at Union Chapel. Trustees of Catawba Island Historical Society from left: Linda Snyder, Rick Thomas, Craig Koerpel, president, Don Rhodes, Bill Van Der Giessen, vice president, Ken Landon, secretary/treasurer, John Gibson, and Cindy Gunderson. Museum Curator Connie Batterton is at far right.

  • DSCF1455-jpg-1

    Patrons get first look at Museum exhibits about the Lake Erie Ice Harvesting industry, and future plans for unique Catawba displays.

  • SOC-catawba-18

    Inside the Catawba Island Historical Society Museum where the first exhibit is on the Lake Erie's Ice Industry from the 1900's.

  • SOC-catawba-19

    Don and JoAnn Rhodes at the Catawba Island Historical Society Museum.

  • SOC-belmont-1

    Janine Avila, Art Purinton, Jan Purinton, and Edgar Avila at the Catawba Island Historical Society Museum for the Belmont Lobster Party.

    The Blade/Barbara Hendel
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-chamber26p-13

    From left, Bob and Molly Mack, Larry Boyer and Paula Dusseau during the Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce Clambake at the Hollywood Casino in Toledo.

    The Blade/Kurt Steiss
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-chamber26p-14

    Desserts sit for guests during the Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce Clambake.

    The Blade/Kurt Steiss
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-chamber26p-15

    Tracy Paramore, left, and Michael Baginski during the Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce Clambake.

    The Blade/Kurt Steiss
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-chamber26p-16

    From left, Jean Drees, and Kay and Ernie Jones during the Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce Clambake.

    The Blade/Kurt Steiss
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-chamber26p-17

    Deb and Randy Ernsthausen during the Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce Clambake.

    The Blade/Kurt Steiss
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-chamber26p-18

    A worker prepares clams during the Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce Clambake.

    The Blade/Kurt Steiss
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-chamber26p-19

    From left, Bill and Heather McDonnell, and Terry and Marc Stockwell during the Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce Clambake.

    The Blade/Kurt Steiss
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-chamber26p-20

    A worker carries lobsters to the food serving area during the Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce Clambake.

    The Blade/Kurt Steiss
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-chamber26p-21

    From left, Chris and Gilda Mitchell, and Josh Goltiao during the Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce Clambake.

    The Blade/Kurt Steiss
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-chamber26p-22

    A watermelon clam decoration during the Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce Clambake.

    The Blade/Kurt Steiss
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-chamber26p-23

    Suzanne Norton, left, Tracy Selis during the Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce Clambake.

    The Blade/Kurt Steiss
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-chamber26p-24

    Charlie and Jo Chambers during the Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce Clambake.

    The Blade/Kurt Steiss
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-chamber26p-25

    People mingle at their tables during the Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce Clambake.

    The Blade/Kurt Steiss
    Buy This Image

  • SOC-lobster-party-6

    George Eistetter at the Toledo Country Club Lobster Party.

  • SOC-lobster-party-7

    Liz Batman, left, joins Jamie Adams and Samantha DeVictor at the Toledo Country Club's Lobster Party.

  • SOC-lobster-party-9

    Food being prepared at the Toledo Country Club's Lobster Party.

  • SOC-lobster-party-10

    The tables are set at the Toledo Country Club Lobster Party.

  • SOC-lobster-party-11

    Ian, Julie and Brad Rubini at the Toledo Country Club Lobster Party.

  • SOC-Rock-n-Roar-5

    Steven Wines, left, Brittani McGowan, Christina Freeman, and Matt Slanina attend the Rock N Roar event at the Toledo Zoo.

  • SOC-Rock-n-Roar-6

    Jen Paszko, Terri Boles, and Donna Bankey attend the Rock N Roar event at the Toledo Zoo.

  • SOC-Rock-n-Roar-7

    Abiye Ritchey, left, joins Alex Thiel as they attend the Rock N Roar event at the Toledo Zoo.

  • SOC-Rock-n-Roar-8

    Lindsay McLaughlin, left, joins Julie Ruetz and Amy Kaczorowski as they attend the Rock N Roar event at the Toledo Zoo.

  • SOC-Rock-n-Roar-9

    Kristen Mori, left, and Heather Burrow attend the Rock N Roar event at the Toledo Zoo.

ADVERTISEMENT

A SIGHT well worth seeing is the Catawba Island Historical Society Museum at Union Chapel on East Porter Street. The museum opened June 16 and welcomes visitors en route to the area islands.

The chapel, a former non-denominational church established in 1888, was an idle Catawba Island Township building since the early 1980s, but it has been renovated and leased to the Catawba Island Historical Society as a museum to preserve, protect, and share the area’s heritage. It all started in a log house behind the Ottawa City General Store and Museum at NW Catawba Road and East Porter Street when local historian Don Rhodes, owner, was permanently closing and sought help relocating the historical treasures he had collected and displayed for decades. He, with friends, started the Catawba Island Historical Society, a nonprofit corporation headed by its president, Craig Koerpel.

Exhibits are both static and changing themes, including artifacts, photos, books, and documents. The museum’s first exhibit, A Cool Way to Spend a Hot Day, is dedicated to the ice harvesting industry on the Lake Erie shoreline and along Sandusky Bay at the turn of the 19th century, when there were no electric refrigerators so ice was cut from the lake to help keep food fresh.

Cutting, storing, and delivering ice provided winter employment for agricultural workers when the summer ended. “Serving an ice cold beverage 150 years ago were remarkable tributes to ingenuity and hard work,” said Connie Batterton, museum curator. Catawba Island had two commercial ice houses: one near the site of the present Miller’s Ferry Dock and another where the Catawba Island Club is now located. In addition, the fish companies each had their own ice refrigeration facilities, while some local families shared smaller ones.

Privy to a sneak peek before the opening were individuals, businesses, and board members who paid $1,000 each as lifetime members. A reception and program at the Catawba Island Township Community Hall was followed by a tour of the new museum and cultural center. These people are the founders in the group’s Council of Nabagon, named after the legendary Native American from Catawba Island legend and lore, according to trustee Linda Snyder, event organizer.

Among the trustees present were Rick Thomas, Don Rhodes, Bill Van Der Giessen, Ken Landon, John Gibson, and Cindy Gunderson. Also seen were Catawba Island Club’s Jim Stouffer, Carol Imes Luscombe and John Luscombe, and Cherry Peirce and her family including granddaughter Lexi Fodor, who designed the museum logo. She is the daughter of Danielle and Todd Fodor.

Items such as an antique ballot box and key fob from the Cliff House Club at Catawba Point decorated tables with food samples from Cheese Haven, Bassett’s Market, the Nor’Easter Club, the Orchard, Rudder’s, Catawba Island Garden Club, Mary Jane Gibson, Debbie Newman, Mon Ami Winery, and Firelands Winery.

There is no admission charge. Annual memberships are $25 or $100 for a lifetime membership.

Hours of operation are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday, plus the second and fourth Saturdays of each month through October. For information, call 419-967-5363 or go to catawbaislandhistoricalsociety.com or the society’s Facebook page.

YARK Subaru Rock N Roar at the the Toledo Zoo and Aquarium was on the wild side. Jim Lieber Fever DJ spun ’70s, ’80s, ’90s, and today’s tunes in the Africa! Overlook. Dancing continued with Fu5ion playing pop, R&B, jazz, rock, and country from different eras in the zoo’s air-conditioned Malawi Event Center, boasting a 73-foot-long aquarium wall of colorful African fish. Refreshments were available via the zoo concessions and cash bars.

The major sponsor behind Yark was Hollywood Casino Toledo, followed by Cumulus Toledo, Lamar, Kroger, and Yuengling. The $45,000 net proceeds benefit the zoo’s conservation initiatives locally and globally including migrating birds, Tasmanian devils, Pacific birds, Kihansi spray toads, and more.

MANY of the area country clubs hosted their annual lobster parties including Toledo Country Club and Belmont Country Club. Mmm: summer salads, corn, potatoes, seasonal fruit, and more including lobster, the mainstay.

In addition was the annual Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce Clambake presented by PNC at Hollywood Casino Toledo outside overlooking the Maumee River. The 700-plus movers and shakers enjoyed cocktails and then dined under a giant tent decorated with red, white, and blue. Among the crowd of lobster lovers were Ben and Peggy Brown, Ron and Sandi Dulay, David and Mary Charles Woodward, Keith Burwell, Tom and Betsy Brady, and Jeff Abbas and wife Rhona Alter.

Sponsors included Buckeye Broadband, Telesystem, The Blade, Palmer Energy Co., RCO Law, Bowling Green State University and the University of Toledo, plus a host of others including HCR ManorCare, Health Management Solutions, Hylant, Go Logistic, Mercy Health, Meyer Hill Lynch, PricewaterhouseCoopers, and ProMedica.A SIGHT well worth seeing is the Catawba Island Historical Society Museum at Union Chapel on East Porter Street. The museum opened June 16 and welcomes visitors en route to the area islands.

The chapel, a former non-denominational church established in 1888, was an idle Catawba Island Township building since the early 1980s, but it has been renovated and leased to the Catawba Island Historical Society as a museum to preserve, protect, and share the area’s heritage. It all started in a log house behind the Ottawa City General Store and Museum at NW Catawba Road and East Porter Street when local historian Don Rhodes, owner, was permanently closing and sought help relocating the historical treasures he had collected and displayed for decades. He, with friends, started the Catawba Island Historical Society, a nonprofit corporation headed by its president, Craig Koerpel.

Exhibits are both static and changing themes, including artifacts, photos, books, and documents. The museum’s first exhibit, A Cool Way to Spend a Hot Day, is dedicated to the ice harvesting industry on the Lake Erie shoreline and along Sandusky Bay at the turn of the 19th century, when there were no electric refrigerators so ice was cut from the lake to help keep food fresh.

Cutting, storing, and delivering ice provided winter employment for agricultural workers when the summer ended. “Serving an ice cold beverage 150 years ago were remarkable tributes to ingenuity and hard work,” said Connie Batterton, museum curator. Catawba Island had two commercial ice houses: one near the site of the present Miller’s Ferry Dock and another where the Catawba Island Club is now located. In addition, the fish companies each had their own ice refrigeration facilities, while some local families shared smaller ones.

Privy to a sneak peek before the opening were individuals, businesses, and board members who paid $1,000 each as lifetime members. A reception and program at the Catawba Island Township Community Hall was followed by a tour of the new museum and cultural center. These people are the founders in the group’s Council of Nabagon, named after the legendary Native American from Catawba Island legend and lore, according to trustee Linda Snyder, event organizer.

Among the trustees present were Rick Thomas, Don Rhodes, Bill Van Der Giessen, Ken Landon, John Gibson, and Cindy Gunderson. Also seen were Catawba Island Club’s Jim Stouffer, Carol Imes Luscombe and John Luscombe, and Cherry Peirce and her family including granddaughter Lexi Fodor, who designed the museum logo. She is the daughter of Danielle and Todd Fodor.

Items such as an antique ballot box and key fob from the Cliff House Club at Catawba Point decorated tables with food samples from Cheese Haven, Bassett’s Market, the Nor’Easter Club, the Orchard, Rudder’s, Catawba Island Garden Club, Mary Jane Gibson, Debbie Newman, Mon Ami Winery, and Firelands Winery.

There is no admission charge. Annual memberships are $25 or $100 for a lifetime membership.

Hours of operation are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday, plus the second and fourth Saturdays of each month through October. For information, call 419-967-5363 or go to catawbaislandhistoricalsociety.com or the society’s Facebook page.

YARK Subaru Rock N Roar at the the Toledo Zoo and Aquarium was on the wild side. Jim Lieber Fever DJ spun ’70s, ’80s, ’90s, and today’s tunes in the Africa! Overlook. Dancing continued with Fu5ion playing pop, R&B, jazz, rock, and country from different eras in the zoo’s air-conditioned Malawi Event Center, boasting a 73-foot-long aquarium wall of colorful African fish. Refreshments were available via the zoo concessions and cash bars.

The major sponsor behind Yark was Hollywood Casino Toledo, followed by Cumulus Toledo, Lamar, Kroger, and Yuengling. The $45,000 net proceeds benefit the zoo’s conservation initiatives locally and globally including migrating birds, Tasmanian devils, Pacific birds, Kihansi spray toads, and more.

MANY of the area country clubs hosted their annual lobster parties including Toledo Country Club and Belmont Country Club. Mmm: summer salads, corn, potatoes, seasonal fruit, and more including lobster, the mainstay.

In addition was the annual Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce Clambake presented by PNC at Hollywood Casino Toledo outside overlooking the Maumee River. The 700-plus movers and shakers enjoyed cocktails and then dined under a giant tent decorated with red, white, and blue. Among the crowd of lobster lovers were Ben and Peggy Brown, Ron and Sandi Dulay, David and Mary Charles Woodward, Keith Burwell, Tom and Betsy Brady, and Jeff Abbas and wife Rhona Alter.

Sponsors included Buckeye Broadband, Telesystem, The Blade, Palmer Energy Co., RCO Law, Bowling Green State University and the University of Toledo, plus a host of others including HCR ManorCare, Health Management Solutions, Hylant, Go Logistic, Mercy Health, Meyer Hill Lynch, PricewaterhouseCoopers, and ProMedica.

Click to comment

Quis autem vel eum iure reprehenderit qui in ea voluptate velit esse quam nihil molestiae consequatur, vel illum qui dolorem?

Temporibus autem quibusdam et aut officiis debitis aut rerum necessitatibus saepe eveniet.

Copyright © 2018 Toledo Blade

To Top

Fetching stories…