Friday, Jun 22, 2018
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Letters to the Editor

To the editor: Human rights and our opioids

Opioids-State-Taxes-Glance

An arrangement of pills of the opioid oxycodone-acetaminophen.

ASSOCIATED PRESS Enlarge

The issues surrounding this supposed opioid epidemic violate human rights.

Chronic pain patients are not drug addicts. Most of the overdoses are from a illicit fentanyl and heroin mixed with a cocktail of barbiturates.

I am a chronic pain patient and I am petrified my doctor is going to stop giving me my medication. They have already cut my dose in half. I’m functional, but I still have very bad days. And I cannot go back to living the way I was before I was put on my medicine. That’s not living. And I’m not the only one that’s thinking this way.

The recent, restrictive opioid guidelines offered by the Center of Disease Control was a knee-jerk response that is impacting thousands of lives. Please take a deeper look at what’s going on — don’t just threaten the doctors who want to help us.

I am monitored by pill count and drug screen. What more can you ask for? I take my medication as prescribed.

SHEILA SMITH
Liberty Center

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Is the Deep State a bad thing?

As a centrist, I am glad that America has a “Deep State” to keep our ship afloat and balanced, and generally headed in the right direction.

Our Deep State is made up of almost half-a-million government employees, many with highly-qualified civil or foreign service, with oaths to uphold our laws. Sure, politicians get elected to temporarily man the helm. Some steer left, while others steer right.

Remember that the temporarily-elected politicians are not the government. The politicians just reflect the current, and sometimes fickle, mood of the county. I think that our Deep State, which consists of experienced, career employees, actually keep our country headed in the right, long-term direction .

PETER SHAWAKER
West Toledo

Politicians aren’t medical pros

When I go to a doctor, I expect they will give me full and accurate medical information. If a doctor did not, I would see someone else.

Under a proposed gag rule, the government would limit what information doctors could give to the 59,000 Ohioans who get care through the Title X program. It would also limit what providers a person could go to. This is a dangerous proposal that would make it more difficult for people to get the care they need. It takes medical decision-making out of the hands of patients and doctors and gives it to politicians.

Politicians should not be making health care decisions for anyone but themselves and their families. I should be able to trust that my doctor is giving me all of my medical options when I seek care and that they can refer me to a doctor who can provide it. Ohio politicians should speak out against this gag rule.

KATELYN ELLIOTT
Bowling Green

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